Recover Bitcoin Private (BTCP) sent from a Z-address

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This is a Tutorial on how to recover bitcoin private (BTCP) That was sent from a z_address to a b_address on a ledger nano s and they are now stuck with error “Index out of range”


Ledger hardware wallets are not suited to receive BTCP coming from a Z-address. Ledger devices only support BTCP the way Bitcoin protocol works. Every feature specific to BTCP not included in the Bitcoin protocol is not yet supported.

If you own Z-address coins anyway, here is a tutorial to recover them. This procedure is a bit long and tedious, most of all to install the Bitcoin Private client, so take care now to only receive coins from B-address on your wallet.

  1. Take your Recovery sheet with your 24-word backup
  2. Download our BIP39 – Mnenomic ZCash tool, it is a HTML-file.
  3. Disconnect your computer from the internet.
  4. From your download folder, open the BIP39 – Mnemonic Code Zcash.html you just downloaded. It should load in your browser. 
  5. Carefully copy the 24 words in the “BIP39 Mnemonic” field, separated by a simple space, without any punctuation mark
  6. Select “BitcoinPrivate” by scrolling in the “Coin” field
  7. Scrolldown in the page to find the “Derived addresses” below
  8. Select the addresses holding the Z-address coins, and copy the corresponding private keys
  9. Install the Bitcoin Private Desktop GUI wallet:
  10. When this Bitcoin Private client is fully installed, import the private key you copied to create a wallet
  11. Connect your Ledger device and launch the BTCP Electrum app.
  12. Click on “Receive” and copy the btcp address
  13. In the Bitcoin Private Desktop GUI wallet, make a sending transaction to this address to recover your coins

How To Add Swap Space on Ubuntu 16.04

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Introduction

One of the easiest way of increasing the responsiveness of your server and guarding against out-of-memory errors in applications is to add some swap space. In this guide, we will cover how to add a swap file to an Ubuntu 16.04 server.

Warning

Although swap is generally recommended for systems utilizing traditional spinning hard drives, using swap with SSDs can cause issues with hardware degradation over time. Due to this consideration, we do not recommend enabling swap on DigitalOcean or any other provider that utilizes SSD storage. Doing so can impact the reliability of the underlying hardware for you and your neighbors. This guide is provided as reference for users who may have spinning disk systems elsewhere.

If you need to improve the performance of your server on DigitalOcean, we recommend upgrading your Droplet. This will lead to better results in general and will decrease the likelihood of contributing to hardware issues that can affect your service.

What is Swap?

Swap is an area on a hard drive that has been designated as a place where the operating system can temporarily store data that it can no longer hold in RAM. Basically, this gives you the ability to increase the amount of information that your server can keep in its working “memory”, with some caveats. The swap space on the hard drive will be used mainly when there is no longer sufficient space in RAM to hold in-use application data.

The information written to disk will be significantly slower than information kept in RAM, but the operating system will prefer to keep running application data in memory and use swap for the older data. Overall, having swap space as a fall back for when your system’s RAM is depleted can be a good safety net against out-of-memory exceptions on systems with non-SSD storage available.

Check the System for Swap Information

Before we begin, we can check if the system already has some swap space available. It is possible to have multiple swap files or swap partitions, but generally one should be enough.

We can see if the system has any configured swap by typing:

  • sudo swapon –show

If you don’t get back any output, this means your system does not have swap space available currently.

You can verify that there is no active swap using the free utility:

  • free -h
Output
              total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
Mem:           488M         36M        104M        652K        348M        426M
Swap:            0B          0B          0B

As you can see in the “Swap” row of the output, no swap is active on the system.

Check Available Space on the Hard Drive Partition

The most common way of allocating space for swap is to use a separate partition devoted to the task. However, altering the partitioning scheme is not always possible. We can just as easily create a swap file that resides on an existing partition.

Before we do this, we should check the current disk usage by typing:

  • df -h
Output
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
udev            238M     0  238M   0% /dev
tmpfs            49M  624K   49M   2% /run
/dev/vda1        20G  1.1G   18G   6% /
tmpfs           245M     0  245M   0% /dev/shm
tmpfs           5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
tmpfs           245M     0  245M   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
tmpfs            49M     0   49M   0% /run/user/1001

The device under /dev is our disk in this case. We have plenty of space available in this example (only 1.1G used). Your usage will probably be different.

Although there are many opinions about the appropriate size of a swap space, it really depends on your personal preferences and your application requirements. Generally, an amount equal to or double the amount of RAM on your system is a good starting point. Another good rule of thumb is that anything over 4G of swap is probably unnecessary if you are just using it as a RAM fallback.

Create a Swap File

Now that we know our available hard drive space, we can go about creating a swap file within our filesystem. We will create a file of the swap size that we want called swapfile in our root (/) directory.

The best way of creating a swap file is with the fallocate program. This command creates a file of a preallocated size instantly.

Since the server in our example has 512MB of RAM, we will create a 1 Gigabyte file in this guide. Adjust this to meet the needs of your own server:

  • sudo fallocate -l 1G /swapfile

We can verify that the correct amount of space was reserved by typing:

  • ls -lh /swapfile
  • -rw-r–r– 1 root root 1.0G Apr 25 11:14 /swapfile

Our file has been created with the correct amount of space set aside.

Enabling the Swap File

Now that we have a file of the correct size available, we need to actually turn this into swap space.

First, we need to lock down the permissions of the file so that only the users with root privileges can read the contents. This prevents normal users from being able to access the file, which would have significant security implications.

Make the file only accessible to root by typing:

  • sudo chmod 600 /swapfile

Verify the permissions change by typing:

  • ls -lh /swapfile
Output
-rw------- 1 root root 1.0G Apr 25 11:14 /swapfile

As you can see, only the root user has the read and write flags enabled.

We can now mark the file as swap space by typing:

  • sudo mkswap /swapfile
Output
Setting up swapspace version 1, size = 1024 MiB (1073737728 bytes)
no label, UUID=6e965805-2ab9-450f-aed6-577e74089dbf

After marking the file, we can enable the swap file, allowing our system to start utilizing it:

  • sudo swapon /swapfile

We can verify that the swap is available by typing:

  • sudo swapon –show
Output
NAME      TYPE  SIZE USED PRIO
/swapfile file 1024M   0B   -1

We can check the output of the free utility again to corroborate our findings:

  • free -h
Output
              total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
Mem:           488M         37M         96M        652K        354M        425M
Swap:          1.0G          0B        1.0G

Our swap has been set up successfully and our operating system will begin to use it as necessary.

Make the Swap File Permanent

Our recent changes have enabled the swap file for the current session. However, if we reboot, the server will not retain the swap settings automatically. We can change this by adding the swap file to our /etc/fstab file.

Back up the /etc/fstab file in case anything goes wrong:

  • sudo cp /etc/fstab /etc/fstab.bak

You can add the swap file information to the end of your /etc/fstab file by typing:

  • echo ‘/swapfile none swap sw 0 0’ | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab

Tweak your Swap Settings

There are a few options that you can configure that will have an impact on your system’s performance when dealing with swap.

Adjusting the Swappiness Property

The swappiness parameter configures how often your system swaps data out of RAM to the swap space. This is a value between 0 and 100 that represents a percentage.

With values close to zero, the kernel will not swap data to the disk unless absolutely necessary. Remember, interactions with the swap file are “expensive” in that they take a lot longer than interactions with RAM and they can cause a significant reduction in performance. Telling the system not to rely on the swap much will generally make your system faster.

Values that are closer to 100 will try to put more data into swap in an effort to keep more RAM space free. Depending on your applications’ memory profile or what you are using your server for, this might be better in some cases.

We can see the current swappiness value by typing:

  • cat /proc/sys/vm/swappiness
Output
60

For a Desktop, a swappiness setting of 60 is not a bad value. For a server, you might want to move it closer to 0.

We can set the swappiness to a different value by using the sysctl command.

For instance, to set the swappiness to 10, we could type:

  • sudo sysctl vm.swappiness=10
Output
vm.swappiness = 10

This setting will persist until the next reboot. We can set this value automatically at restart by adding the line to our /etc/sysctl.conf file:

  • sudo nano /etc/sysctl.conf

At the bottom, you can add:

/etc/sysctl.conf
vm.swappiness=10

Save and close the file when you are finished.

Adjusting the Cache Pressure Setting

Another related value that you might want to modify is the vfs_cache_pressure. This setting configures how much the system will choose to cache inode and dentry information over other data.

Basically, this is access data about the filesystem. This is generally very costly to look up and very frequently requested, so it’s an excellent thing for your system to cache. You can see the current value by querying the proc filesystem again:

  • cat /proc/sys/vm/vfs_cache_pressure
Output
100

As it is currently configured, our system removes inode information from the cache too quickly. We can set this to a more conservative setting like 50 by typing:

  • sudo sysctl vm.vfs_cache_pressure=50
Output
vm.vfs_cache_pressure = 50

Again, this is only valid for our current session. We can change that by adding it to our configuration file like we did with our swappiness setting:

  • sudo nano /etc/sysctl.conf

At the bottom, add the line that specifies your new value:

/etc/sysctl.conf
vm.vfs_cache_pressure=50

Save and close the file when you are finished.

Conclusion

Following the steps in this guide will give you some breathing room in cases that would otherwise lead to out-of-memory exceptions. Swap space can be incredibly useful in avoiding some of these common problems.

If you are running into OOM (out of memory) errors, or if you find that your system is unable to use the applications you need, the best solution is to optimize your application configurations or upgrade your server.

Running Bitcoin Core Node

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Decided to help out the bitcoin network by running a core node, after several hours I am now only 20 weeks behind on transaction information that’s downloading. It will be done in a couple hours!

2017-12-03 01_12_43-Bitcoin Core - Wallet

2017-12-03 01_14_32-Bitcoin Core - Wallet

 

Donate:

BTC:  3JfLcg4gKQApNPH3i8uJZ6KyqrFdQrUMig

ETH:  0xe5D923caB105CbbDE1fFC421F635ff8E986C8231

BCH: 1KHPBG5Fz1Qvrnfnkk4ZL1KxArpaZ7tqvu

VTC: 3JwErKBEGpqfzGELeeBb46Sn1irjvhPN1G

 

Crypto Mining

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Got an idle device? Computer, Old Cell phone? Start Mining multiple types of crypto coins in exchange for Bitcoin! Which the price of keeps climbing! Bitcoin is going to hit the 10K price mark by Christmas.

Get as much Bitcoin as you can while the value is low and make some money! Click Here

TITANPOINTE The NSA’s Spy Hub in New York, Hidden in Plain Sight

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They Called it Project X. It was an unusually audacious, highly sensitive assignment: to build a massive skyscraper, capable of withstanding an atomic blast, in the middle of New York City. It would have no windows, 29 floors with three basement levels, and enough food to last 1,500 people two weeks in the event of a catastrophe.

But the building’s primary purpose would not be to protect humans from toxic radiation amid nuclear war. Rather, the fortified skyscraper would safeguard powerful computers, cables, and switchboards. It would house one of the most important telecommunications hubs in the United States — the world’s largest center for processing long-distance phone calls, operated by the New York Telephone Company, a subsidiary of AT&T.

Read more: https://theintercept.com/2016/11/16/the-nsas-spy-hub-in-new-york-hidden-in-plain-sight/

6 Ways to Easily Show the Contents of Password Fields

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We are all often told to try and stay security conscious online or when using applications that require secure access, and passwords is one of the most important parts of creating a more secure environment for yourself. It’s not unusual to end up with different login details for every site and program that needs it which is the most secure way. This is especially important when there are multiple users on the same machine as using a single password for everything could give someone access to your personal information very easily.

With the possibility of so many different passwords to remember, it could become quite a nightmare trying to log into a website, email program or instant messenger etc, if it wasn’t for the ability to save them on your PC so you don’t have to remember them. These days, most browsers offer to store your login details for you, and there are some great dedicated managers around to centralize all your passwords such as Lastpass which makes filling in forms and logins even easier. Most applications will also store your password, but often it’s still hidden behind asterisks in the programs settings. If the password is saved and stored behind asterisks or bullets, you can easily use a tool and hopefully show the password hidden underneath. Here’s 6 different ways to try and get to the password under the asterisks in your applications and on websites. It might only save you a few seconds over digging into the program or browsers settings, or it might mean you don’t have to reset your passwords online because the program won’t tell you what your password is.
Read More: https://www.raymond.cc/blog/easily-show-the-contents-of-password-fields/view-all/

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